The Paw Print

Mid90s Movie Review

Back to Article
Back to Article

Mid90s Movie Review

Story by Katie Lennon, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Jonah Hill’s directing debut movie Mid90s is a well-made tribute movie to the 90s. Whether or not someone was born in this era, Mid90s is sure to give the audience a sentimental feel. From the music to the filming, Mid90s is one of the best movies to have come out in 2018.

This movie is about a 13-year-old kid named Stevie and his escape from his unstable home life by making new, older friends he met at a skate shop. The movie is set in Los Angeles and follows his life and journey through adolescence. Early in the movie, Stevie becomes friends with these older kids who love to skateboard. He looks up to them and does all he can to fit in with them, even if it means experimenting with drugs, alcohol, and girls. The director of this movie is Jonah Hill, who is mostly known as an actor. He has starred in popular movies such as “Superbad” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” however, he did not make an appearance in this movie.

Of all the kids that appear in this movie, only some are professional actors. This may seem strange, but this made the movie feel more authentic. The only person who had some acting experience was Sunny Suljic, who played Stevie. He had appeared in movies such as “The Killing of a Sacred Deer.” These kids did a tremendous job with what they were given and were able to play the roles of complex characters, even though they were recruited from a skatepark.

The music in Mid90s is another aspect of the movie that adds the nostalgic feel that it establishes. A few songs that are played are originals that were created just for the movie. However, many songs played were songs from the 90s. For example, there is a scene where the boys are at a party, and Stevie is walking to a bedroom with a girl. In the background of the scene, the song “Where Did You Sleep Last Night” by Nirvana, is playing. Not only does this song fit the scene perfectly, it also fits the time period. If the movie was to not focus on the music aspect and played songs from different eras, its nostalgic feel would be gone and the message of the movie would not be portrayed as well.

The cinematography of Mid90s is something to focus on when watching it. The entire movie was filmed using a 4:3 (1.33) aspect ratio, giving it more of a square, old-school look. This ratio refers to the relationship between the width and the height. Movies used to rely on the 1.33 style, but as film developed, more movies started using 1.85 and 2.35. These were ratios that filled a bigger portion of the screen. This minor filming detail added to the nostalgic feel of the movie and made for some very well-shot scenes. One scene that stands out is when all of the boys were skateboarding down a street while the sun was setting. The camera stays still while the boys slowly came toward the lens. The reason this scene stands out is that even though it is a relatively simple scene, and no major events are happening, it shows the bond that is building between the boys. In the shot, Stevie looks happy to be a part of a group. Even though Stevie is the farthest behind, and has to drag his foot along the street in order to skateboard, it is one of the first times the audience feels the joy that Stevie and the kids feel while skateboarding.

Although many aspects of the movie were well-done, there was one missed opportunity that could have added to it. The movie revolves around skating, yet it fails to illustrate the reason why the kids skate. Because all the kids in the movie are portrayed to have come from broken homes and troubling family lives, the movie could have dove deeper into elaboration on why skating is what they turn to in order to cope with the pressures of life.

The ending of the movie is another minor issue. The ending is well-done, however, it was abrupt. There is no real ending scene, it merely just ends with the video that one of the kids, Fourth-grade, had been working on since the beginning. While this ending is fitting and ends the movie on a higher-note than what it was heading toward, it did not feel as if the movie should have ended there. Even one more short scene could have wrapped up the movie. However, I do understand that because the ending feels a little abrupt and the audience leaves feeling incomplete, it does give the movie the real-life authentic feel that it sustained through the entirety of the eighty-four minutes that the movie runs.

When looked at as a whole, Mid90s was a great movie that captured the essence of being a kid in the 90s. The fact that Jonah Hill directed and created this movie adds to the experience of watching it and leaves the audience in awe of what, a usually comedian actor, is capable of creating.  

klennon.pawprint@gmail.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Writer
Katie Lennon, Staff Writer

Katie Lennon is a Sophomore at Boca Raton Community High School. This is her first year on The Paw Print. When Katie isn't writing, she loves to scuba...

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Entertainment

    Phantom of The Opera Review

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Dining & Cuisine

    University Commons Review

  • Entertainment

    What to consider when buying headphones

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Entertainment

    Alternative Upcoming Bands

  • Arts

    Upcoming Shows at the Broward Center

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Dining & Cuisine

    Sushi Ray Restaurant Review

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Entertainment

    Bloom Album Review

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Entertainment

    GLOW Up and Fight

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Entertainment

    2018 Grammy’s highlights

  • Mid90s Movie Review

    Entertainment

    Ed Sheeran: Divide Tour

Navigate Right
The School Newspaper of Boca Raton High School
Mid90s Movie Review